Interesting Facts

The American Pit Bull Terrier has been around for centuries helping man. In WWI a pit bull named Stubby was awarded 2 medals, one for warning troops of a gas attack, and the other for holding a German spy until American troops arrived. He also earned the rank of sergeant, and became the most decorated canine soldier. He was later invited to the White House by Presidents Wilson, Harding and Coolidge, and given a life long membership to the American Legion, Red Cross, and YMCA. 
 
During the First World War, there was an American propaganda poster that represented the rival European nations with their national dogs dressed in military uniforms; and in the center representing the United States was an APBT declaring in a caption below: "I'm Neutral, But-Not Afraid Of Any Of Them."
 
Throughout the years, the APBT has continued to show it's loyalty to man. In January of 1993 an APBT named Weela saved the lives of 29 people, 17 dogs, 13 horses, and 1 cat during the California floods. She risked her own life to bring stranded animals food, and led people to safer areas to cross the high waters. She was named Ken-L-Ration's Dog Hero of the Year. Weela also passed and held titles for the Canine Good Citizenship and Temperament Test.

 

And then there are dogs like Snowball, who works for the St. Tammany's Louisiana S&R Dog Team, or Peace, who at only 8 months old rescued a 6 year old autistic boy that had wandered into a marsh.

 

The American Canine Temperament Testing Association, which sponsors tests for temperament titles for dogs, reported that 95% of all APBTs that take the test pass, compared with a 77% passing rate for all breeds on average. The APBT's passing rate was the fourth highest of all the breeds tested.

 

Contrary to popular belief, APBT's do not have 1600 psi biting pressure or locking jaws. Dr. I Lehr Brisbin of the University of Georgia states, "To the best of our knowledge, there are no published scientific studies that would allow any meaningful comparision to be made of the biting power of various breeds of dogs. There are, moreover, compelling technical reasons why such data describing biting power in terms of 'pounds per square inch' can never be collected in a meaningful way. All figures describing biting power in such terms can be traced to either unfounded rumor or, in some cases, to newspaper articles with no foundation in factual data."

 

Futhermore, Dr. Brisbin states, "The few studies which have been conducted of the structure of the skulls, mandibles and teeth of pit bulls show that, in proportion to their size, their jaw structure and thus its inferred functional morphology, is no different than that of any breed of dog. There is absolutely no evidence for the existence of any kind of 'locking mechanism' unique to the structure of the jaw and/or teeth of the American Pit Bull Terrier." {Information gleaned from the ADBA pamphlet titled "Discover the American Pit Bull Terrier}

 

In 1936, thanks to "Pete the Pup" in the Lil Rascals, who familiarized a wider audience with the APBT, the AKC registered the APBT as the "Staffordshire Terrier".

 

This name was changed to "American Staffordshire Terrier" in 1972 to distinguish it from its smaller (English) cousin, the Staffordshire Bull Terrier. During this time period, and the years that preceded it, the APBT was a well-liked dog in America.

 

At this time the APBT was considered an ideal family pet. Because of his fun-loving, forgiving temperament, the breed was rightly considered an excellent dog for families with small children. Even if most of them couldn't identify the breed by name, kids of the Lil Rascals generation wanted a companion just like "Pete the Pup".

 

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Our goal is to provide abused, abandoned or homeless pit bull dogs with the medical attention they need; as well as the love and attention they deserve to heal - both emotionally, and physically.

 

We will work to facilitate the rescue and placement of abused or abandoned pit bulls into responsible homes and participate in fundraising to provide veterinary treatment; spay/neuter; food and shelter.

 

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